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South Korea Schools Guide
Looking for a school in South Korea? Our round up of the best schools in the country is here to help. Read our reviews, watch our videos and use our search tools to find the perfect school in South Korea for your child.

Where to begin when looking for a school in South Korea

Getting to grips with an entirely new schooling system can be a challenge, particularly if you've just relocated from abroad. We've demystified the educational journey in South Korea, bringing you all the key points you need to know. Find out more here, then browse our South Korea school reviews to compare and contrast private schools across the country and the rest of the world.

What are private schools like in South Korea?
South Korea is one of the most educated countries in the world, and the standard of schooling is high. Across the board, academic results are consistently good, and students are driven to do very well. 




When does school start in South Korea?
Private schools in South Korea start at the same time as UK and US schools, making for an easy transition and an average education length of 12.5 years. However, age in South Korea is calculated differently: a child is a one-year-old on the day they are born, with an additional year subsequently added on the next New Year's Day. This means that the average Korean national will finish school at 19-years-old, as opposed to the western age of 18. 

Are there English-speaking schools in South Korea? 
English is the main language of teaching at international schools in South Korea, except in schools affiliated with a certain country (where some teaching will also take place in the relevant first language). The only exception is the German Primary School – the only school in the country that teaches exclusively in German.

Can international students go to school in South Korea?
Yes. International schools are open to both Koreans and any families with an international passport, while ‘foreign’ schools are open to families with international passports only. International families may also send their children to public schools, but students must have a basic level of Korean as this is the language of instruction.
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Alphabetical
All-through
Offers boarding
Mixed


Branksome Hall Asia
Jeju-do
Dulwich College Seoul
Seoul
Dwight School Seoul
Seoul
King's InterHigh Southeast Asia
Korea Foreign School
Seoul
Korea International School (KIS) Pangyo
Seoul
Korea International School (KIS) Seoul Campus
Seoul
North London Collegiate School Jeju (NLCS)
Jeju-do
Seoul Foreign School
Seoul
Yongsan International School of Seoul (YISS)
Seoul


Dwight School Seoul
Seoul
Seoul Foreign School
Seoul
Yongsan International School of Seoul (YISS)
Seoul
Dulwich College Seoul
Seoul
Korea Foreign School
Seoul
Korea International School (KIS) Seoul Campus
Seoul
Korea International School (KIS) Pangyo
Seoul
Branksome Hall Asia
Jeju-do
North London Collegiate School Jeju (NLCS)
Jeju-do
King's InterHigh Southeast Asia






Branksome Hall Asia
Jeju-do
Dulwich College Seoul
Seoul
Dwight School Seoul
Seoul
Korea Foreign School
Seoul
Korea International School (KIS) Pangyo
Seoul
North London Collegiate School Jeju (NLCS)
Jeju-do
Seoul Foreign School
Seoul
Yongsan International School of Seoul (YISS)
Seoul


Branksome Hall Asia
Jeju-do
North London Collegiate School Jeju (NLCS)
Jeju-do


Branksome Hall Asia
Jeju-do
Dulwich College Seoul
Seoul
Dwight School Seoul
Seoul
King's InterHigh Southeast Asia
Korea Foreign School
Seoul
Korea International School (KIS) Pangyo
Seoul
Korea International School (KIS) Seoul Campus
Seoul
North London Collegiate School Jeju (NLCS)
Jeju-do
Seoul Foreign School
Seoul
Yongsan International School of Seoul (YISS)
Seoul




Education in South Korea
Schooling and education in South Korea are taken very seriously, with final exams acting as a major milestone for a child’s future. South Korea as a country does not have a wealth of natural resources to prop up their economy – and as a result, many say the country's success derives from its skilled workforce and rigorous education system. A degree from a good university in South Korea positively correlates with one’s social standing, making education at the highest level extremely competitive. Additionally, South Korea's gross tertiary education ratio in 2018 reached 95.9% - one of the highest in the world; only further justifying the shared importance placed on education.

What are private schools like in South Korea?
Private schools in South Korea are highly sought-after institutions due to parents wanting the very best education for their children. They have smaller class sizes, ideal working conditions, and a wide range of co-curricular activities. Statistically, private school results are strong, and pupils at private school perform highly on university entrance exams. Most private schools are English-speaking, co-educational and all-through, meaning students can attend all the way from nursery through to Year 13.

The difference between public and private schools in South Korea
There is actually very little variation between public and private schools in South Korea, other than the obvious cost and language. However, most Korean independent schools are day schools, with a few boarding facilities found outside the capital on Jeju Island.